Location

Yuma Territorial Prison Locator Map

Elevation 120 feet   Fees

Contact the Park:
(928) 783-4771
Yuma Territorial Prison
1 Prison Hill Road
Yuma, AZ 85364

Facilities

Visitor Center Restrooms Gift Shop Museum Picnic Areas/Shelters

Nearest Services: 1 mile

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511 Speed Code

511 logo

Park's Speed Code: 4252#

Fees

Park Entrance Fees:
Adult (14+): $6.00
Youth (7–13): $3.00
Child (0–6): FREE

Fee Schedule

Friends Group

Chain Gang for Yuma Territorial Prison

Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park

Park Hours

The park is open daily from 9 am to 5 pm until May 31, 2014.

From June 1 to Sept. 30, 2014 the park is open 9 am to 5 pm Thursday through Monday (closed Tues. & Wednesday). The park will also be closed for maintenance from Aug. 2 – 17, 2014.


Introductory Park Video

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About the Park


Archway to the cells at Yuma Terrirtorial Prison State Historic Park.

On July 1, 1876, the first seven inmates entered the Territorial Prison at Yuma and were locked into the new cells they had built themselves. At Yuma Territorial Prison State Historic Park walk through the actual strap iron cells and solitary chamber of Arizona Territory’s first prison. Now a museum, the building houses photographs and colorful exhibits of those who once “involuntarily” stayed there and the prison life they had to endure. A total of 3,069 prisoners, including 29 women, lived within the walls during the prison’s 33 years of operation.

Despite an infamous reputation, written evidence indicates that the prison was humanely administered, and was a model institution for its time. The only punishments were the dark cells for inmates who broke prison regulations, and the ball and chain for those who tried to escape. Come experience this fascinating slice of Arizona history. The park offers a museum with exhibits, a gift shop, video presentation, picnic area, and restrooms.

Prison Life

A total of 3,069 prisoners, including 29 women, lived within these walls during the prison's thirty-three years of operation. Their crimes ranged from murder to polygamy, with grand larceny being the most common. A majority served only portions of their sentences due to the ease with which paroles and pardons were obtained. One hundred eleven persons died while serving their sentences, most from tuberculosis, which was common throughout the territory. Of the many prisoners who attempted escape, twenty-six were successful, but only two were from within the prison confines. No executions took place at the prison because capital punishment was administered by the county government.

Written evidence indicates that the prison was humanely administered, and was a model institution for its time. The only punishments were the dark cells for inmates who broke prison regulations, and the ball and chain for those who tried to escape. During their free time, prisoners hand-crafted many items. Those items were sold at public bazaars held at the prison on Sundays after church services. Prisoners also had regular medical attention, and access to a good hospital.

Schooling was available for convicts, and many learned to read and write in prison. The prison housed one of the first "public" libraries in the territory, and the fee charged to visitors for a tour of the institution was used to purchase books. One of the early electrical generating plants in the West furnished power for lights and ran a ventilation system in the cellblock.

By 1907, the prison was severely overcrowded, and there was no room on Prison Hill for expansion. The convicts constructed a new facility in Florence, Arizona. The last prisoner left Yuma on September 15, 1909.

The Yuma Union High School occupied the buildings from 1910 to 1914. Empty cells provided free lodging for hobos riding the freights in the 1920s, and sheltered many homeless families during the Depression. Townspeople considered the complex a source for free building materials. This, plus fires, weathering, and railroad construction, destroyed the prison walls and all buildings except the cells, main gate and guard tower; but these provide a glimpse of convict life a century ago.

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